Few reasons why girls are not in school

https://juongeraldfoundation.com/

Millions of girls aren’t at school today. They are shut out of education because of discrimination, poverty, emergencies and culture. These girls have the same hopes and dreams as boys. They want to learn, fulfill their potential, work and help their families and communities.

But too often they are treated as second-class. They are exploited, abused and simply disregarded in many countries.

Early Marriage

Too often marriage is seen as a higher priority than education. The low value attached to girls’ schooling means few other options are available to them. 

Boys can be affected but most victims of child marriage are girls. It is estimated that every year 15 million girls are married before they turn 18. After their wedding they leave the education system and, because they have fewer educational skills, they and their families are more likely to live in poverty.

Pregnancy

In many parts of the world, girls who are pregnant – regardless of their circumstances – will be excluded from school. 

Many do not return after giving birth due to those rules, stigma, fees, lack of childcare and the unavailability of flexible school programmes. 

About 16 million girls aged 15 to 19 and some one million girls under 15 give birth every year—most in low- and middle-income countries, according to the World Health Organization. 

Child/domestic labour

Girls often stay home to take care of younger siblings and bear the main burden of housework. While educating a boy is considered a sound investment, it is sometimes considered to be a waste of time for girls. 

Many girls begin working as early as five years old – mainly in agriculture or in homes as domestic servants. Child domestic workers are particularly vulnerable to trafficking, forced labour, sexual violence and many health issues.

Girls often stay home to take care of younger siblings and bear the main burden of housework. While educating a boy is considered a sound investment, it is sometimes considered to be a waste of time for girls. 

Many girls begin working as early as five years old – mainly in agriculture or in homes as domestic servants. Child domestic workers are particularly vulnerable to trafficking, forced labour, sexual violence and many health issues.

There are more than 168 million child labourers – 11% of all children in the world – who are working instead of learning. There are significantly more girls than boys working in service industries.

There are more than 168 million child labourers – 11% of all children in the world – who are working instead of learning. There are significantly more girls than boys working in service industries.